TEDxEindhoven 2017 event wrap up

TEDxEindhoven 2017 event wrap up

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It’s a wrap! Last week we presented TEDxEindhoven 2017 at Eindhoven’s Evoluon to a sold-out audience. After more than 10 months of preparation, it was a resounding success. If you missed the event, you can still see the live stream footage on our website. Here is a short summary of the day! Watch the photo’s of the day here!

Part 1

Opening the day’s event, Kirsten Swensen spoke about the rise of social media and its impact on our self-consciousness. Through her photography, she documents a range of human reactions from resistance to surrender and advocates being true to yourself.

Up next, Prof. Steven Kyffin shared a range of examples on how society drives efficiency, which is exactly what limits our imagination. Many ideas have thrived because they were developed by trans and multidisciplinary teams.

Bart ter Haar Romeny followed with interesting facts about our one kilo of networked neurons called the brain. From a professor who studies the brain and how it works, Bart still said, “We know nothing yet about our brain, our own personal light bulb.”

Before breaking for morning tea, Kuang-Yi Ku explained his background in both dentistry and design, and how he combined the two. Using his knowledge of dentistry and inspiration from Japanese pornography, Kuang-Yi shared some of his recent projects.
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Part 2

Ruben van Vreeland started the discussion again after the break. He shared the story of how he became an ethical hacker, the companies he hacked and the law suits he was threatened with. Ruben announced he will not stop writing code until 7.4 billion people are secure and safe online.

The next challenge came from Dr. Joost Smiers, who believes if we take away copyright, products become cheaper and the money saved can be invested in knowledge development instead. Joost asked the audience for their opinions on this radical belief, but opinions were divided so Joost closed by saying, “One last advice; don’t be lazy about it! Spread the word!”

After Joost, Camilla van den Boom compared ideas to sea turtles. Like sea turtles, only a fraction of ideas survive. Camilla petitioned everyone to try to improve the survival rate of new ideas to adulthood by iterating and learning from experience.

Eefje op den Buysch closed the first half of the day by sharing her perspective on transmedial storytelling. It’s about engaging your audience and this is done by creating a world for the story to be told in; a parallel universe. By making the environment and the characters your truth.
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Part 3

After lunch, Diewke van den Heuvel took us on her life journey. Coming to Eindhoven, Diewke received a warm welcome of her neighbours and she started photographing them. She realised that these photographs created a west-european stereotype even though Eindhoven is a city of 160 nationalities. Now Diewke is on a mission to photograph as many different nationalities as she can from all around the world.

Then Jasper Rijpma conducted a thought experiment with the audience, questioning how we should design our educational system. Jasper believes we need to teach our kids to work in the new online environment, checking where all the accessible information is coming from and critiquing online content. Critical thinking and ethical awareness for kids is now more urgent than ever.

Mpanzu Bamenga shared his own story that led him to becoming a politician in Eindhoven. Mpanzu encouraged everyone to be an inclusive person – to see someone’s talent, give them a chance, remove obstacles and provide them a platform to shine.
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Last part!

After the afternoon coffee break, Frank van Valkenhoef had everyone’s attention again with his love story for computer technology. Frank believes we all need to start relationships with technology and discover the capabilities of the new objects. Instead of seeing them as objects, but rather as an extension of yourself.

Next up, Anne Hélène Gelebart showed scientific examples of emerging possibilities in plastics, including self-healing plastics, light-reactive plastics and plastics that clean solar panels in the desert after a sandstorm. By sharing her discoveries, Anne Hélène aims to remove the stigma around plastics and start discussing new opportunities in plastics.

Dr. Clément Vidal closed the event with the confronting statement that we as humans are insignificant in terms of space and time. He explained that we all see our world changing, but it’s very hard to see the future. Our world can either grow, collapse, stay steady or truly transform. We are forming a new level of intelligence that merges human intelligence and machine intelligence.

Thank you to everyone who made TEDxEindhoven 2017 possible!

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